Togo officials learn from Rwanda’s reconciliation process

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Head of the Togolese delegation, Hazia Awa Nana-Daboya (right) receives documents from Fidel Ndayisaba.

Head of the Togolese delegation, Hazia Awa Nana-Daboya (right) receives documents from Fidel Ndayisaba.

A team of commissioners from the Togo High Commission for Reconciliation and Strengthening National Unity are in Rwanda to learn from the Rwandan experience and story of unity and reconciliation which has seen the country change its history in 22 years after the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi

The team arrived this May 30, 2016 and will spend seven days in Rwanda whereby they will meet with different stakeholders including Rwanda’ s National Unity and Reconciliation Commission (NURC) and communities in Rwanda which have made progress in attaining unity and reconciliation.

The head of the Togolese delegation, Hazia Awa Nana-Daboya said that the team is in Rwanda to learn the good practices that have been essential in rebuilding the nation after genocide.

“Togo didn’t get to experience genocide, though it was close to getting there. We are here to get some tips of conflict resolution, which our country needs at this time” Nana-Daboya said.

Fidel Ndayisaba, the Executive secretary of Rwanda National Unity and Reconciliation Commission (NURC), told the visiting Togolese team that Rwanda has managed to get to where it is because of a good political system and policies put in place by the current government.

“Rwanda’s success story has been based on the strong will of the government to unite and reconcile Rwandans unlike in the past governments. This has seen the use of traditional and conventional justice system like Gacaca courts which are intended to reconcile than to punish” Ndayisaba said

Rwanda’s bid to have Unity and reconciliation is now measured at 92.5% while the general social living between Rwandans of all walks of life is at 96.1%, according to the national unity and reconciliation commission (NURC) report 2014-2015.

The commission says that there has been progress seen in the last five years ever since the last research that showed the unity barometer at 87% in 2010.

Ndayisaba also says that the process of unity has been impeded by lingering signs of genocide ideology which are measured at 25.8% and genocide related perceptions measured 27.9%.

 

 

About the author

Olive Ndaka is the Junior Editor for RwandaEye. An investor and young entrepreneur, she is a quick learner and has contributed many articles for RwandaEye in Kinyarwanda.

More posts by | Visit the site of Ndaka

 

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