PAM-Rwanda Chapter Launch in Higher Learning Institutions – A quest for alternatives

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By Geoffrey MUSHAIJA

 L-R: Panelists Dr Usta Kayitesi, the principal of UR CASS; Dr Augustin Iyamuremye, the chairperson of the Elders Advisory Council; and Senator Tito Rutaremara during the launch of Pan African Movement in universities held at UR Huye Campus.

L-R: Panelists Dr Usta Kayitesi, the principal of UR CASS; Dr Augustin Iyamuremye, the chairperson of the Elders Advisory Council; and Senator Tito Rutaremara during the launch of Pan African Movement in universities held at UR Huye Campus.

Pan African Movement – Rwanda Chapter launch in higher institutions of learning is remarkable and timely quest for Africa’s alternative development conceptualizations. Historically, Africa has been following unrealistic development concepts and models that are not of her own creation but colonial and neo-colonial prescriptions.

Pan African Movement calls on the Africa intellectuals and bureaucrats to rethink alternatives on what, why and how to move away from western centric development models and concepts which do not address or suit Africa realities and sensitivities.

The alternative thinking enhances the attitudes, perceptions and strategic sense Africans role in addressing Africa’s issues from the perspective of geo-political and cultural diversity.  Africa is faced with unsolved concerns emanating from crash of interests in and out of her continent but the academia have the potential to accord her a rightful place in the global community by  nurturing a hybrid of inward and outward looking young generation with skills and interest to address Africa problems and tap into her potentials and opportunities.

However, Africa cannot address her challenges by default but with Africans themselves seeking solutions and experiences to review, evolve and work out Africa agenda in a manner required to achieve the status and deserved respect.

Therefore, higher learning institutions in Africa are critical in studying alternative mechanisms on how Africa can develop, integrate, participate and respond effectively to the ensuing globalization with a clear idea of the neo-colonial international systems in place.

The major challenge for higher institutions of learning today is to review their curriculum to set education agenda based on Africa realities away from conventional approaches which are ‘one shoe fits all’ design and good lessons can be drawn from Rwanda home grown initiatives as the key contributors of modern Rwanda development success stories.

Ensuring the safety and wellbeing of Africa future generation, intellectuals and bureaucrats have to delink Africa countries from predatory globalizing agents in order to revive the nation state which acts with autonomy and with the ability to defend own development discourse unrestrained. Hence, promoting alternative policy regimes void of transitional pains of neo-colonial grafted models and concepts of development which is an assault and abuse of Africa’s contemporary democracy.

 

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About the author

Olive Ndaka is the Junior Editor for RwandaEye. An investor and young entrepreneur, she is a quick learner and has contributed many articles for RwandaEye in Kinyarwanda.

More posts by | Visit the site of Ndaka

 

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